Friday, July 26, 2013

Surrounding Yourself With More of You


 
When it comes to the challenges of building an executive team, nearly every CEO or business owner will say to me: “I’m a really good judge of character, so I go with my gut.” Too often, as a result, these leaders shortcut a thorough interview, and that perfect person turns out to be a terrible technical or motivational fit, resulting in more turnover or worse, an employee who stays and makes everyone else miserable.

Surrounding yourself with people you “click with” because they share your same strengths, values, and ways of thinking are exactly the people least likely to challenge your decisions or catch the balls you drop. That’s a risky game to play in a competitive marketplace where diversity of thought and creative offerings are what keep organizations alive. When you surround yourself with more of “you,” you set up—or, worse, institutionalize—blind spots that can prevent you from seeing oncoming challenges.

When you hire others who live on your wavelength, you unintentionally create a support system of people who are not equipped to challenge you, to question your thinking, or to offer you a different perspective and direction. You essentially become trapped in a self-made bubble, missing opportunities to hear valid dissent, better approaches, or alternative ideas. Consequences range from stagnation and disengagement, to monotony or rigidity. Putting your emotional intelligence to work in the hiring and promoting process can help prevent these blind spots from occurring and give you a new way to think about what makes for the “perfect” hire.

What if a leader’s preferences and point of view so closely match those around them that they develop collective team blind spots? This represents a significant organizational risk that can escape the collective consciousness until it’s too late.

It’s perfectly natural to be drawn to someone who understands you. You may finish each other’s sentences and bristle at the same annoyances. I know it’s tempting in the interview to think, “Wouldn’t it be great to work with that person?” Regardless of the type of similarities, as an interviewer, you must be aware of any temptation to give priority to hiring or promoting someone who is similar to you, rather than consciously seeking out individuals who are able to bring a unique approach or mindset to the team or to offer a special skillset that’s needed for success. Surrounding yourself with more of you is a sinister trap, because it lures you with a mirror that reflects your strengths, your style, and your language, while silently multiplying your (admittedly few and relatively minor) shortcomings. I know, a “mini-me” is as much fun to be around as you are. But wouldn’t it be even better to surround yourself with skills complementary but not identical to yours? People who would thrive in areas you would rather hand off anyway? 

This article is an summary excerpt from Ego vs EQ: How Top Leaders Beat 8 Ego Traps Using Emotional Intelligence. Click here to order a copy of the book 

www.EgovsEQ.com



1 comment:

Keith Arruda said...

I guess it is true with any size business. As a small business owner I feel I have made those mistakes in hiring people I bond with over small lack of skill trade. I will now continue to challenge myself by looking at the interview process different. I need a better cultivation of employees.

Keith Arruda
Arruda's Landscaping LLC